Diversity on US Magazine Covers Improves in 2016

Photo: Courtesy Fashionista

Photo: Courtesy Fashionista

Fashionista researched 147 covers from 10 leading U.S. fashion publications and discovered the following: while some titles remained stagnant, the majority saw distinct improvement. Among the leading publications, which included Allure, Cosmopolitan, Elle, Glamour, Harper’s Bazaar, InStyle, Nylon, Teen Vogue, Vogue and W – Teen Vogue featured the most diversity this year by including women of color on seven of its 11 issues, 63.6 percent. — with cover stars like Amandla Stenberg, Willow Smith and Simone Biles.

This is so important because young women look for themselves on the covers of magazines. They want to feel that the magazine speaks to them and the cover is the fist thing they see. There is a long way to go for inclusivity but this is a statistic that is moving in the right direction. I’m buying it!

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The Charmer who is Leandra Medine

Courtesy: Fashionista - Leandra Medine

Leandra Medine (left) interviewed by Fashionista’s Chantal Fernandez Monday night. Photo: Meghan Uno/Fashionista

ManRepeller is like an onion. You have to peel the layers to see it unfold. It’s not supposed to feel prescriptive.” ~ Leandra Medine

I had just returned from a quick bathroom break and realized with a little horror that the interview had already started. My heart sank for a moment when I heard a voice introduce her, my favorite fashion blogger, Leandra Medine. As I walked up the aisle to my seat, Leandra made eye contact with me and we smiled. She had me from that moment, the pure charmer who is Leandra Medine. Originator of the blog and phenomenon, ManRepeller. Leandra shared her story and offered words of wisdom with Chantal Fernandez at Fashionista’s NYC Fashion Meetup Series.

Leandra talked about how ManRepeller took off unexpectedly in 2010 and how she has been building it into something of substance and aligning herself with solid, talented people since. “I trust my gut.” Leandra talked about believing in the Mickey Drexler (Chairman and CEO of J. Crew) emotional IQ test, a ‘fire-pit-in-belly’ ring through which one connects with the right people.

I was there, in the audience with the college grads and 20-somethings, all looking for answers and fashion advice as they start their careers. I am of course at a different place in my life but I was inspired as anyone, perhaps even more. Because it was not about age, it was not about facts and figures – it was about instinct and honesty and humor and vulnerability and feeling – all things Leandra Medine. I walked away from the interview reminded that everything is possible and one’s career can start at any time. I believe in Leandra’s sentiments when she says, “Everyone gets what he/she wants. You just have to be clear about what it is you want.”

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Sagging pants: Florida’s not buying it!

 

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Cher* (from the movie, Clueless. 1995): “So okay, I don’t want to be a traitor to my generation and all but I don’t get how guys dress today. I mean, come on, it looks like they just fell out of bed and put on some baggy pants and take their greasy hair (eww!) and cover it up with a backwards cap and like, we’re expected to swoon? I don’t think so.

It’s been a look for almost 20 years: boys wearing baggy, sagging pants with their underwear exposed. And ever since I heard these words uttered by Cher, the main character of the movie Clueless, about the grodiness of it all, I have been aware of this particularly offensive look. But now, there is a growing trend in some cities to change it with legal ordinances. News today via Fashionista, that in Ocala, Florida, the City Council has voted that wearing sagging pants and exposed underwear carries a punishable fine: up to $500 and up to six months in jail, the maximum punishment. Specifically, Ocala City Council defines ‘sagging’ as pants hanging “two inches below their natural waist in a way that exposes underwear or bare buttocks.”

But, according to Fashionista, the question is raised: can this ordinance be misused as racial profiling? Continue reading

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