Myriam’s Foulard

Myriam and her foulard, along the Mediterranean

Foulard: the French word for scarf! During my recent trip to Paris and the South of France, I couldn’t help but admire the foulards around the necks of many elegant French women. Their outfits are never complete without them, no matter the time of year or fashion tendency. French women will always make it work. There are day-time styles – light and airy, and night-time styles – more luxurious and silky.

When I reached my destination on the Mediterranean, I found out that the South France had been key in the manufacturing of silk fabrics during the Middle Ages. The first silk factories opened their doors in the region during the 15th Century and became an engine for the local economy of the time. On my long walks around a few Medieval towns which still maintain their old-world charm, I felt the importance of this icon and its place in fashion. It was nearly impossible not to be seduced by its shine and luminosity. I walked into a tiny store filled with silk scarves in all colors imaginable and waited until one of them called my attention. Its soft pink shades were shining and inviting. I tried on many, but I kept coming back to my first choice. The owner, a lovely woman in her fifties, looked at me and said: “I believe the right scarf found you.” It was clear what I had to do.

As with so many things in life, I see now that the love affair between my French scarf and me was pure destiny. Medieval roads lead me to it.  Now I am home and I wear it with pride and let it take me back to beautiful memories of an extraordinary trip, full of discovery, charm, and glamour.

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Harper’s Bazaar Through the Years

1867: The first issue of Bazaar, devoted to fashion and literature, is published on November 2.

1867: The first issue of Bazaar, devoted to fashion and literature, is published on November 2.

The Harper’s Bazaar staff has been celebrating Vintage Week, by taking a look back at the best vintage Harper’s BAZAAR covers through the years. Notable covers include: 1873 – announcement of the big the fan trend; 1900 – the popularity of the mechanical sewing machine leads to more elaborate sleeve designs; 1936 – the iconic Why Don’t You …? column first appears; 1943 –  Diana Vreeland discovers Lauren Bacall, giving her the first magazine cover on the March WWII-inspired issue of BAZAAR; 1950 – the summer issue also features a Junior BAZAAR; 1956 – Audrey Hepburn is photographed by Richard Avedon; 1963 – an Emilio Pucci design is featured on the December issue; 1965 -Avedon’s iconic cover starring Jean Shrimpton taps into the space craze of the decade.

Harper’s Bazaar is the oldest continuously published fashion magazine in the world; fashion history has been told through the covers and the pages of this honored magazine. Fun to step back in time and see fashion trends and culture unfold before our eyes!

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We Think We Are the First to Wear It, But No!

FRINGE! Photo: Sasha/Getty Images

Fringe frocks from the 1920s!  Photo: Sasha/Getty Images

There is a history and a beauty to every piece of clothing we wear. And though we often hear about the latest trend or fashion fad we may be surprised to know that these fads actually date back to other times and places; they have simply been reincarnated. Leave it to the ever-stylish site, Refinery29, to share some fashion history and trace five of today’s most popular pieces to their origins: the turtleneck, fringe, the flared jean, the sports bra, and overalls. Says Refinery29, “you’ll never look at them in the same way again.” And I wholeheartedly agree!

Here is more on the history of fashion from Refinery29

The Turtleneck: “Turtlenecks made an appearance in the late 1800s, but served a much more high-fashion purpose. Women wore the garment with exaggerated sleeves and a form-fitting silhouette. As the Met Museum reports, this style is one of the earliest examples of women’s sportswear.”

Fringe: “Anyone with a smidgen of fashion history knowledge may think of fringe as a ubiquitous trend of the 1920s. The fringe frocks of this era — famously designed by Madeleine Vionnet — partnered closely with the dance craze du jour: the Charleston.” Continue reading

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