Celebrating British Vogue at 100!

Bo Gilbert, 100 year-old model, Photo by Phil Poynter

Bo Gilbert, 100 year-old model, Photo by Phil Poynter

I always liked keeping myself looking quite decent, even if I wasn’t going out. I try to keep the standards up. I dress to suit myself – I certainly don’t dress up for boys.” ~ Bo Gilbert, 100 year model

Harvey Nichols, the London department store, debuted a very special campaign to celebrate British Vogue’s 100-year anniversary in May – starring Bo Gilbert, the first 100 year-old model to be featured in the magazine. “We devised a campaign that reflected the playful attitude Harvey Nichols is famous for, celebrating both the 100th Anniversary of British Vogue and also style in its entirety,” commented Shadi Halliwell, creative and marketing director at Harvey Nichols. Photographed by renowned fashion photographer, Phil Poynter,  the campaign was featured exclusively in its centenary issue.

Bo Gilbert was the perfect choice to celebrate what it means to be a timeless fashionista; someone who loves fashion and dresses for herself. In the accompanying documentary film, which shows the journey of Gilbert’s Vogue fashion shoot, Gilbert shares how she loved wearing hats (and misses that women don’t wear them now), the styles of the 1950s and the first time she saw a lady in a trouser suit, and her deep fondness for Audrey Hepburn. Says Gilbert, “I love wearing nice things – it’s always appealed to me, and it still does,”

Celebrating beauty at every age. I’m buying it! Happy Birthday Vogue … and Bo Gilbert!

 

 

 

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A Fashion Trio for the Ages: Hepburn, Givenchy, and Sabrina

Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina, wearing Hubert de Givenchy creation: photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Audrey Hepburn as Sabrina, wearing Hubert de Givenchy creation: photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Last night TCM aired one of my all-time favorite Audrey Hepburn movies, 1954’s Sabrina. Sabrina tells the tale of a chauffeur’s daughter who pines over the handsome playboy son of the wealthy, Long Island family for whom her father works. After her father ships her off to Paris to attend cooking school and kick her crush, Sabrina returns two years later sporting a complete makeover, including a new haircut and Parisian style. When Sabrina accepts an invitation to a fancy dance from her former crush, she promises to wear “a lovely evening dress with yards of skirt and way off the shoulders.” And so enters Sabrina, as the belle of the ball, in the strapless, iconic Hubert de Givenchy dress that would launch the french designer and one of the greatest collaborations in film and fashion history: Hepburn and Givenchy. And here, the story behind the story gets more interesting … Continue reading

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Nothing Tops the Turtleneck

Courtesy: The New York Times

Courtesy: The New York Times

Today is the perfect day to pull out my black turtleneck; I was reminded of something I wrote just a year ago. This New York Times’ article inspired me to find my own black turtleneck and bring me closer to my fashion icon, Audrey Hepburn. Here is the piece … 

Reading “The Turtleneck’s Comeback” in the New York Times by Erica M. Blumenthal inspired me to seek out a classic black turtleneck – one with a modern, playful edge. Blumenthal’s news that the commanding black turtleneck is making a fashion statement, and is far from basic black, was enough to push me out the door to find one of my own. Says Blumenthal: “Not for nothing did Audrey Hepburn and Diana Vreeland make the black turtleneck a signature look. It lends the wearer an air of discipline, of authority. But it doesn’t have to be sexless or strict. This fall, the style is back with a vengeance, and the new crop, far from being stern, is built for fun.”

I love that fashion reinvents itself to fit the times while understanding that what makes a classic, a classic, is at the heart of fine dressing. A turtleneck surely fits that bill. And who doesn’t want to capture the iconic look of Audrey Hepburn for herself?

 

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Harper’s Bazaar Through the Years

1867: The first issue of Bazaar, devoted to fashion and literature, is published on November 2.

1867: The first issue of Bazaar, devoted to fashion and literature, is published on November 2.

The Harper’s Bazaar staff has been celebrating Vintage Week, by taking a look back at the best vintage Harper’s BAZAAR covers through the years. Notable covers include: 1873 – announcement of the big the fan trend; 1900 – the popularity of the mechanical sewing machine leads to more elaborate sleeve designs; 1936 – the iconic Why Don’t You …? column first appears; 1943 –  Diana Vreeland discovers Lauren Bacall, giving her the first magazine cover on the March WWII-inspired issue of BAZAAR; 1950 – the summer issue also features a Junior BAZAAR; 1956 – Audrey Hepburn is photographed by Richard Avedon; 1963 – an Emilio Pucci design is featured on the December issue; 1965 -Avedon’s iconic cover starring Jean Shrimpton taps into the space craze of the decade.

Harper’s Bazaar is the oldest continuously published fashion magazine in the world; fashion history has been told through the covers and the pages of this honored magazine. Fun to step back in time and see fashion trends and culture unfold before our eyes!

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We Think We Are the First to Wear It, But No!

FRINGE! Photo: Sasha/Getty Images

Fringe frocks from the 1920s!  Photo: Sasha/Getty Images

There is a history and a beauty to every piece of clothing we wear. And though we often hear about the latest trend or fashion fad we may be surprised to know that these fads actually date back to other times and places; they have simply been reincarnated. Leave it to the ever-stylish site, Refinery29, to share some fashion history and trace five of today’s most popular pieces to their origins: the turtleneck, fringe, the flared jean, the sports bra, and overalls. Says Refinery29, “you’ll never look at them in the same way again.” And I wholeheartedly agree!

Here is more on the history of fashion from Refinery29

The Turtleneck: “Turtlenecks made an appearance in the late 1800s, but served a much more high-fashion purpose. Women wore the garment with exaggerated sleeves and a form-fitting silhouette. As the Met Museum reports, this style is one of the earliest examples of women’s sportswear.”

Fringe: “Anyone with a smidgen of fashion history knowledge may think of fringe as a ubiquitous trend of the 1920s. The fringe frocks of this era — famously designed by Madeleine Vionnet — partnered closely with the dance craze du jour: the Charleston.” Continue reading

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Audrey Hepburn, fashion’s favorite muse, like we’ve never seen her

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Audrey Hepburn golfing

Audrey Hepburn golfing

I, like so many people the world over, am crazy about Audrey Hepburn. Lovely and stylish, yes. But it’s the reports of who she was as a person that make her even more beautiful in my eyes. So this week, when Stylecaster cited 20 photos of Audrey Hepburn – the personal, private Audrey Hepburn – not the Audrey Hepburn in the quintessential LBD from Breakfast at Tiffany’s (my favorite movie, by the way), I was moved.

In this podcast episode, I talk about my fascination with Audrey Hepburn, and why this is the season to fall in love with this wonderfully kind icon and in her own words, “seek out the good in people.”

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