Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow?

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One of the things that we must all endure as we age is the subtle changes in our body and certainly, our hair. Hard to notice at first, but shifting hormones change the consistency of our hair and losing lustre and thinning strands becomes a reality that eventually cannot be overlooked. Our hair represents the pinnacle of our youth and vitality; as that shifts it can affect our self image. For years I took the care of my hair for granted, simply washing it before leaving the house. As I got older I wasn’t prepared for the changes in my hair.

There are things we can do, however, to help turn back time. The answer for me came a few years ago in the form of a late-night infomercial. As I flipped through the television channels one night I found a commercial for WEN® Cleansing Conditioner by Chaz Dean. I have been using WEN® for the last few years and today I wake up to hair that looks and feels like it did in its younger days. You may want to try WEN® or there may be another product that works for you. Whichever you choose, just don’t give up on your hair.

Note: Turning Fashion Inside Out and Melissa Kaplan Guarino were not compensated for this endorsement. All opinions are my own.

Photo by Lauren Hagerstrom

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Age-appropriate to Simon Doonan

Simon Doonan interview with Etsy - Photo credit: Albert Sanchez

Simon Doonan – Photo credit: Albert Sanchez

“I like flowers. I thought we all liked flowers. Flowers come from God. What’s wrong with flowers?” ~ Simon Doonan, “How I Became a Fashion Don’t,” Slate (Magazine).

Simon Doonan had much to say after reading his October Details Magazine, when a caption under the photo of a hip older gentlemen read: “Are you too old for your outfit?” Simon, whom I recently featured here, says no!, Continue reading

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Aging: A slight shift in perception

Me, age 52

It is inevitable. One day you find yourself over 40. You look in the mirror and find that you are not the young person you were. I know about this: I am 52 and I have made this realization several times in the last few years. I am shocked when I notice any number of changes to my body: My arms look a little funny in a specific light, the lines on my face are increasing, I am more aware of the need to pull my stomach in, and my size and weight is up and doesn’t seem to be going down any time soon. A friend told me that she heard actress Goldie Hawn talking about aging, and she said that you must come to terms with the fact that after 50, you may indeed go up a dress size. Hmmm …

I say don’t give up on yourself! In your heart you are the same. Actually, because you have the wisdom of age on your side, you are more the same than ever before. You are still vibrant and want to feel good. You may have to make a slight shift in perception, but you don’t have to give up who you are. In fact, enjoy this new phase and let your fashion choices enhance your life.You may want to wear it knee-length, but wear that skirt. You may want to check the rise on your jeans, but wear those jeans (and wear them fitted; stay away from baggy and non-fitted because they actually make you look older). You may want to check the fit of a tee, but wear it if you like tees and sleeveless shirts as I do. Never forget to wear color. Black will always be slimming and chic. Smile back at yourself the next time you look in the mirror! And don’t stop wearing that dress, no matter what the size.

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Smile back at yourself the next time you look in the mirror!

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About “About Face”

HBO Documentary: "About Face: Supermodels Then and Now"

HBO Documentary: “About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now”

It’s no fun getting old and sick and dying, but why shouldn’t we be allowed to age?
~ Supermodel Jerry Hall

Last Monday, HBO aired a documentary called “About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now.” Directed by photographer and filmmaker Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, the film contains conversations with the worlds’ most celebrated Supermodels of the last 60 years. What started as a concept for a photo shoot of a core group of models from the ’70s and ’80s developed into a full-blown film with a much broader spectrum and selection of women (Carmen Dell’Orefice is 81 years old, for instance, and began her modeling career in the ’40s when it was considered not much more than prostitution) .

I knew the names – I recognized the faces. Christie Brinkley, Jerry Hall, Beverly Johnson, Cheryl Tiegs, Carmen Dell’Orefice, Isabella Rossellini, Paulina Porizkova, Carol Alt and Kim Alexis to name a few. But I had never heard them tell their stories and that was most illuminating for me – to hear the voice behind the face and to go deeper into the fashion world. And Mr. Greenfield-Sanders did not hold back on heavy issues: issues such as racism, sexual harassment, drug abuse and of course, the rarely discussed question of aging. He wanted to explore the idea of beauty as it ages, and what happens to women considered especially beautiful, because as he says, “Aging is difficult for all of us in America. For women who are all about their looks it’s an even more heightened issue.”

Especially beautiful? Is there such a thing? Isn’t it possible that especially beautiful comes with age? I think so. I enjoyed seeing these women as they are now, after time has passed and they have not only survived but thrived; they are more beautiful to me than ever. Aging is real for all of us. Yes it is difficult, but even supermodels find their reality in the aging process; that we are relevant and we still matter in the world. No matter who we are.

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