Jenny’s Style Experiment

Photo Courtesy: JenEric Generation - Outfit details: Tweed skirt: thrifted/$6, Jacket: thrifted/$3, Boots: thrifted/$9, Purse: H&M, Earrings: Etsy/gift, Bracelet: flea market

Photo Courtesy: JenEric Generation – Outfit details: Tweed skirt: thrifted/$6, Jacket: thrifted/$3, Boots: thrifted/$9, Purse: H&M, Earrings: Etsy/gift, Bracelet: flea market

I featured Jenny a over a year ago on TFIO; I was moved by her website motto, to “avoid mediocrity in all areas of life.” Months later and with an adorable addition to her family, Jenny is still committed to living an honest and authentic life. Her latest challenge is to complete one year, twelve months, by thrifting her way to an ideal capsule wardrobe. What does that mean? Let’s find out …

MKG: How brave of you to conceptualize and then actualize your thrift-capsule collection! What was the incentive?

JENNY: Thank you! My incentive was the hope of owning a wardrobe that felt completely “me”, as well as finding clothes that fit perfectly. I wanted to get away from the temptation of trends – not because they are evil – but because I felt like they were inhibiting my efforts to define my personal style. Continue reading

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Nicole’s Body Boop Message of Self-Acceptance …

Nicole, and yes, she IS!

Nicole, and yes, she IS!

Nicole with her fiancé Photo credit:  Tim Jarosz/Orange 2 Photography

Nicole with her fiancé, James
Photo credit: Tim Jarosz/Orange 2 Photography

Every now and then I meet someone who reminds me why I love to share stories. This is a special story of a lovely 28-year old woman, named Nicole. Nicole is a journalist and the author of Body Boop, a website designed to encourage people to be authentic and comfortable with who they are, with a message that says, ‘you don’t have to be like anyone else or compare yourself to others, anymore.’ It is a message that Nicole had to learn herself, in her young life, as she struggled with the diseases of anorexia and bulimia. Diagnosed when she was 14, and hospitalized for treatment three times in her already young life, Nicole has fought hard to love herself and her body just as she is. As I write this, I am thrilled to tell you that Nicole has been doing very well the past four years, is in a healthy place, and is about to be married in September.

My heart sings when I think of Nicole’s courage and her willingness to share her story so that others can find health and peace and self acceptance. I will continue to follow Nicole in her journey as she prepares for her wedding in a few months. Today, Nicole and I spoke about her relationship with fashion and the role that clothing plays in her life …

MKG: When did you start your blog and how did you choose the name, Body Boop?

Nicole: My blog has been live for one month but it has been a dream of mine for a long time. My background is in journalism and I knew I could write it, but I wanted to make sure that I was completely healthy so that my message would be 100% healthy for everyone else.The word ‘Boop’ is something my fiancé and I use with each other; it means nudge or encouragement and that’s what I want to do for others – encourage. Continue reading

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Quotes from fashion’s Tim Gunn

Tim Gunn

Tim Gunn  – Photo Credit: 303 Magazine

Style consultant and Project Runway mentor Tim Gunn is funny. Funny and honest and elegant and incredibly knowledgeable. As well as a terrific yarn-spinner and storyteller. Last winter when I heard him speak at an event I was touched to see that he is the same in person as he is on television – nothing hidden. It was refreshing. So it makes sense that his book, Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible, is like him: honest and informative. I recommend the book if you are interested in knowing more about the history and origins of clothing as well as getting helpful information on how to modernize and wear clothes today. Tim Gunn loves words: I share some of his inspiring excerpts from the book …

You should never shop anywhere that doesn’t seem to have your interests at heart or that makes you feel bad. Shopping is always at least in part about gathering information. Salespeople should help you learn about yourself and what you like. It should not be an exercise in frustration or demoralization. Go someplace with knowledgeable salespeople.” Continue reading

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