Rachel Rides the Fashion Wave!

Rachel Simone Schneider Homeyee's stretch tunic dress - against her own 'green screen!'

Rachel S. Schneider’s Homeyee’s stretch tunic dress – against her own ‘green screen!’

Who knew that it was possible to be a part of a trending phenomenon while purchasing a dress for just $23?? Rachel S. Schneider! A month ago, trending news highlighted a snapchat between meteorologists that went viral when dozens of them purchased a flattering dress on Amazon and featured themselves in front of a green screen. The dress, Homeyee’s stretch tunic, is form-flattering with a hint of spandex and comes in bold colors. For meteorologists who have strict dress code standards this single dress met their needs. But could the dress translate to the average woman? Rachel gave me the scoop on the dress that she made her own:

“I always struggle to find dress clothes that flatter my curvy build and hips. And because I have sensory issues, finding comfortable clothes is tricky for me. When I noticed this story and first saw the dress I was caught by the flattering pencil-skirt bottom. And the black and white houndstooth print with black, form-fitting skirt seemed to have promise. I love houndstooth and always have. It seemed to fit perfectly for the newswomen but I wondered how it would translate to a curvy, real-woman’s figure like mine. The deciding factor was the price – $23 for the dress – when my husband and I have to watch our money was too good to pass up. Because of its popularity there was a delayed delivery date and I had to wait with anticipation. When the dress finally arrived I was excited and hopeful. I tried it on and immediately knew it was special. I felt good when I looked in the mirror. It fit perfectly and hugged my hips in a most flattering way, and it felt comfortable against my skin. What a great find – for the meteorologists and for me!!”Optimized-RachelDress2

 

 

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Fashion Rule #1: It’s the fit, the fit, the fit!

IMGP9724I found these pants at Gambita, the company exclusive to the petite woman (5’4″ and under) created by Caroline Misan Alvo. I am a bit over 5’4″ but the pants were perfect and my eyes flew open when I tried them on and I was reminded of the most important rule of fashion: it’s the fit, the fit, the fit! There was something wildly different about the way these pants fit me; everything hit where it was supposed to – the inseam, the knees, the length – the proportion was flawless. Why is that so important? Because I think many of us are walking around wearing the wrong sizes and in turn, feeling bad about ourselves. Wearing the wrong size can make us feel larger than we actually are. Continue reading

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Maestra Sarta (Master Seamstress)

The maestra sarta

Josephine’s mother, maestra sarta

Josephine’s mother was a maestra sarta, a master seamstress, which was and still is a highly respected and honorable profession in Italy, where she was born. This is the story of Josephine’s mother and the gift she gave two generations of women …

My mom was born in a small town in Italy in 1931. She loved school and hoped to continue her education, but when she finished the 8th grade her family needed her at home to help out. It was the early 1940s, the country was at war, supplies were scarce, and my mother was the oldest of five children. Her mom was not well. She was needed: she sewed shirts, using parts of older shirts to fix newer ones, washed clothes by hand, and ironed for hours so that her younger siblings and extended family had the proper clothing to continue attending school or work. Her family was refined and tried to maintain a normal life despite food shortages and the other casualties of war. My mom remembers that her uncle, a shoemaker, made her high-heeled shoes out of a leather bag and wood. Growing up, I was often told about those shoes; my mom received many compliments when she wore the shoes with a dress she had made.

As the war ended and her younger siblings continued their schooling, my mom had to figure out what to do. She felt that she was too old to start high school and she was still helping out at home. Her dad offered to pay for her to apprentice with a master tailor. She would learn how to design clothing and cut a pattern and sew. This was a very respected profession in those days since many people had their clothes made for them. There weren’t any malls in Italy where people could shop for mass-produced clothing. Since most women of her generation lived with their parents or their husbands and never worked, my grandfather was rather progressive. My mom continued her training in fits and starts, as she also helped at home. She made clothing for her extended family and friends but never worked for a company or opened her own business. In spite of the hardships she faced she remained faithful to her passion: she loved the latest fashions, followed fashion in magazines and imitated the styles of the time, adapting to her conservative culture when needed. Continue reading

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